Clinical features of children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at a single isolation centre in Ghana

Main Article Content

Joycelyn Assimeng Dame
Peter Puplampu
Akosua Sika Ayisi
Ali Samba
Nana Esi Appiah
Nana Fredua Agyeman
Lorna Renner

Abstract

Introduction


Children with coronavirus disease- 2019 (COVID-19) who do not require hospitalisation must isolate to prevent the virus’s spread. This study describes the prevalence, characteristics, source of infection, and treatment outcome among children with asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 admitted to Ghana’s largest isolation centre. 


Methods


We conducted a retrospective descriptive study among children 0-18 years admitted to Pentecost Convention Isolation Centre in Ghana between April 24 to August 31, 2020.  We extracted their clinical details and patient outcome information from their medical records.


Results


The number of children enrolled was 57, with a median age of 16 years (interquartile 12-17). The most common symptom was a headache. Most of the participants admitted from school attributed their source of infection to a school colleague. One patient required transfer to a hospital while the rest were discharged home after de-isolation.


Conclusion


Children with asymptomatic and mild COVID-19 managed in facilities repurposed as isolation centres can reduce the hospital’s care load. As schools re-open fully, school authorities must collaborate closely with public health institutions for rapid testing, tracing, and isolation of all suspected or contacts of COVID-19.

Article Details

How to Cite
Dame, J. A., Puplampu, P., Ayisi, A. S., Samba, A., Appiah, N. E., Agyeman, N. F., & Renner, L. (2021). Clinical features of children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at a single isolation centre in Ghana. Health Sciences Investigations (HSI) Journal, 2(2), 238-243. https://doi.org/10.46829/hsijournal.2021.12.2.2.238-243
Section
Original Research Article
Author Biographies

Peter Puplampu, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ghana Medical School, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

Senior lecturer and consultant physician.  Infectious disease specialist and head of Fever's Unit at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana

Akosua Sika Ayisi, Greater Accra Regional Health Directorate, Ghana Health Service, Accra, Ghana & Pentecost Convention Isolation Centre, Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service, Accra, Ghana

Greater Accra COVID-19 coordinator

Ali Samba, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Ghana Medical School, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

Head of Case Management of COVID-19 Ghana

Director of Medical Affairs, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital

Senior Lecturer, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics

Nana Esi Appiah, Department of Dentistry, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana & Pentecost Convention Isolation Centre, Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service, Accra, Ghana.

Junior resident and clinician at Department of Dentistry.

Supervisor, Pentecost Convention isolation centre

Nana Fredua Agyeman, Pentecost Convention Isolation Centre, Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service, Accra, Ghana.

Deputy supervisor, Pentecost Convention Isolation Centre

Lorna Renner, Department of Child Health, University of Ghana Medical School, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

Associate Professor, Department of Child Health, University of Ghana Medical School, College of Health Sciences

Consultant Paediatrician, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital

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